Economics Of Happiness

Economics of happiness

Happiness is sought by everyone, but the search is not focused in the right direction, we waste our precious time seeking happiness in the mirage of objects, places and people while some seek happiness in caves, mountains or in the deserts. Those who seek happiness in the objective domain are called extroverts. They use their time in wasteless efforts disregarding the subject. In fact, happiness is a function of the subjective, but it is not possible to seek happiness in the subjective because subjection cannot become an object of speaking. This means that to seek happiness in either direction is unhappiness. Many of our budding youngsters felt happy every centimeter when they kissed the nose of gallows. In short, a person experience happiness when he has a satisfaction of having done with a sense of duty what he believes to be right?

A great scientist Newton used to think himself as a child, who only sought pebbles on the seashore and had not dared enter the Ocean of knowledge. In the words of Pundit Jawaharlal Nehru “happiness and work are wedded together”, there is no true happiness without feeling that one is doing something worthwhile. Happiest people on earth are those who are emotionally involved in what they do. Can happiness be an enduring experience in the ups and downs of life? I think it depends on person, if he lives in constant awareness and he is fully conscious of his commitment to living then he will be happy otherwise, the same person will be unhappy. As it is rightly said by someone – We have no more right to consume happiness without producing it.

“HAPPINESS  IS NOT IN DOING BUT IN LIKING WHAT YOU DO”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s